Tagged: International Bank for Reconstruction and Development

Architecture & Urban Planning in China: future cities to make small carbon footprint 0

Architecture & Urban Planning in China: future cities to make small carbon footprint

Even as China undergoes one of the most rapid urban transformations in the world, the Chinese government is promoting sustainable development to curb the country’s growing rate of carbon emissions, a World Bank urban specialist said in Beijing on recently […]

Living in China: “Thank you for Smoking”! 0

Living in China: “Thank you for Smoking”!

One out of every three cigarettes is lit in China, and respiratory disease is on the rise. Some are asking what the future of smoking will look like in China. US-China Today clears the haze […]

Living in China: GDP could be 2.5 times that of the US by 2030 0

Living in China: GDP could be 2.5 times that of the US by 2030

China’s economy could be 2.5 times that of the US by 2030, based on Japan’s experience and the yuan’s appreciation against the greenback, a senior Chinese economist says in Harvard Business Review’s Chinese edition. The forecast by Justin Lin Yifu, head of Peking University‘s China Center for Economic Research and recently appointed chief economist of the World Bank, in the May issue of the magazine published on Thursday is one of the most ambitious for China’s economic growth…

China to Implement Intellectual Property Strategy 2

China to Implement Intellectual Property Strategy

A symposium on implementing Intellectual Property Strategy Higher Education in China has just concluded at Renmin University on October 22. The forum aimed to further implement intellectual property strategies and develop an innovative economy, as well as providing an overview of the intellectual property education system. Binying Wang, assistant director-general of the World Intellectual Property Organization ( WIPO ) explained the importance of the forum…

Pollution in China 5

China: Technology, Innovation and the Environment

Since the beginning of its economical opening — when the first 5-year plans were devised in 1979 — China has being growing at an incredible speed, with its GNP numbers jumping from 44 billion dollars to 1.6 trillion dollars in just 20 years. Such growth has pushed the Chinese manufacturing industry into devouring huge amounts of natural resources in a alarming way: in 2004, China — the 8th largest economy in GNP scale — consumed 8% of all the oil, 31% of all the coal, 10% of all the electricity, 30% of all ore, 30% of all steel, 19% of all aluminum, 20% of all the copper and 40% of all cement produced in the world […]